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Showing 41 - 50 of 59 matches

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  1. Dade Behring Drills Deep Into Customer Requirements to Minimize Risk, Increase Competitive Advantage Locked

    Research | Posted: 2004-06-16

    With only one to three major products under way at a time, and with cycle times as long as three years, Dade Behring, a manufacturer of diagnostic medical equipment, has ample reason to minimize its project risks. To help manage these risks, Dade Behring has implemented Customer-Centered Product Definition (CCPD) to embed customer needs in its product development process. In the CCPD process, each customer interaction occurs in the customer’s own environment, where the goal is to learn, in as much detail as possible, what the customer experiences – their daily routines and processes, and the problems they encounter. Team members then translate interview data into product requirements, which they validate by means of a customer survey. The validated data then serve as a sound basis for brainstorming possible product feature concepts, the strongest of which undergo further testing with customers. (7 pages)

  2. Getting to the Customer’s Pain: Using Customer Centered Definition to Drive Product Development (Part One of Two) Locked

    Research | Posted: 2004-06-16

    Consultant and author, Sheila Mello, has brought her experience to bear on the problem of developing innovative new products that address genuine customer needs. In this interview, Mello describes the basics of a process called Market Driven Product Definition (MDPD) which takes the guesswork out of the discovery of customer requirements. MDPD is a replicable process for discovering, understanding, systematizing and prioritizing customer requirements – including customer’s latent needs. The process encourages cross-functional involvement in a program of visits where developers observe customers in their native environment, developing a holistic view of their products in actual use. In the first part of this interview, Mello shows that by asking customers probing questions that get to the customer’s pain, product developers can ensure a greater likelihood of success at product launch. (6 pages)

  3. Steelcase Gets it Picture Perfect with Video Ethnography Locked

    Research | Posted: 2004-06-16

    When asked to provide data for product requirements, customers may say one thing, while observing them tells a different tale. In other cases, customers’ frames of reference are limited by what they know is possible, while the company developing a product enjoys a much wider range of knowledge about potential solutions. Office furniture giant, Steelcase, uses videotaped observations of individuals and groups in their work environments to put customers at the center of product development. By shadowing users in their work activities, then carefully analyzing the results – through a process called video ethnography – Steelcase collects information from users that would be difficult to extract from interviews or surveys. (6 pages)

  4. Getting to the Customer’s Pain: Using Customer Centered Definition to Drive Product Development (Part Two of Two) Locked

    Research | Posted: 2004-06-16

    In this interview, consultant and author, Sheila Mello, describes the basics of a process called Market Driven Product Definition (MDPD) which takes the guesswork out of the discovery of customer requirements. MDPD is a replicable process for discovering, understanding, systematizing and prioritizing customer requirements – including customer’s latent needs. The process encourages cross-functional involvement in a program of visits where developers observe customers in their native environment, developing a holistic view of their products in actual use. In the second part of this interview, Mello describes a process by which product developers can ensure a greater likelihood of success at product launch by synthesizing a large number of customer data points into usable, measurable requirements. (6 pages)

  5. Abbott Laboratories’s Diagnostics Division Adopts Standardized Approach to Customer-Driven Design Locked

    Research | Posted: 2004-06-16

    Responding to challenges in the health care market, pharmaceutical and medical products industry giant, Abbott Laboratories, decided it was time to add more rigor to its product definition process. Challenges arose from the fact that initial design goals were neither properly stated nor communicated throughout the development process. It had also become clear that Abbott needed a better method to evaluate differences across market segments – including global markets. Abbott responded by putting in place a process they called Customer Driven Design Goals (CDDG). This process is a rigorous means for Abbott to gather customer information; develop customer requirements; generate metrics for the requirements; validate, prioritise and select requirements; and generate product design goals. (5 pages)

  6. Virtual Customers Provide New Methods of Research for Product Development Teams Locked

    Research | Posted: 2004-06-16

    A recent study of web-based methods for gathering product feature preferences from virtual customers suggests a fascinating picture of the future of voice of the customer research. In their report "The Virtual Customer," Massachusetts Institute of Technology’s Ely Dahan and John Hauser review six emerging tools for gathering customer preference information using web-based applications. Virtual Customers is the term the authors use to describe individuals or groups who, using web-based applications, are able to provide product development teams with valuable feedback. The authors show how product developers can use the communication, conceptualization and computation capabilities of the web to enhance customer contacts and gather crucial information on customer preferences. (7 pages)

  7. Software Company Wildseed Uses “Street Research” to Bring Consumers Into the Wireless Experience Locked

    Research | Posted: 2004-06-16

    What better challenge to confront in new product development than designing and building for a consumer audience – teenagers – with an insatiable appetite for the new and the “cool”? Wildseed, an intelligent faceplate provider, gathers powerful feedback from the youth market through “street research” – going to where their target demographic lives and plays. Wildseed has also formed a consumer advisory board, bringing select potential customers on-site to become “partners in fun” in the design and development process. (7 pages)

  8. User-Centric Design Drives Innovation – And the Organizational Structures to Support It Locked

    Quick Insight | Posted: 2009-04-19

    Danfoss A/S, a Danish company whose product portfolio includes a wide range of pumps, sensors and other components critical to the operation of water and wastewater treatment facilities, used ethnographic techniques to explore their end user's use of its products and overall work environment. The company engaged in a ten-month study to better understanding of how end users work with Danfoss’s products and the work processes in which these products are used. The methods used included interviews, continuous videotaping of end users, scenarios, and filmmaking techniques. The research suggested that Danfoss consider restructuring its product development activities to better mirror the environment in which their customers used its products and the values their customers espoused.

  9. Framework & Overview: Cutting-Edge VOC Tools Locked

    Quick Insight | Posted: 2005-04-01

    What are cutting-edge VOC tools? Why use them and what are the challenges of implementation? This month’s focus topic on the latest VOC methodologies seeks to answer these questions. Click here.

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