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  1. What Makes a Blockbuster New Product? Five Critical Practices That Differentiate the Most Successful Product Teams (Part Two of Two) Locked

    Research | Posted: 2004-06-11

    Dr. Gary Lynn, a marketing and innovation professor at Stevens Institute of Technology in Hoboken, NJ. co-conducted a ten-year study of over 700 new product teams, including 49 teams that created some of the most successful products ever launched. His research did not only distinguish what separates successes from failures but also what separates blockbusters from moderately successful products. The researchers identified five factors that differentiate blockbuster teams. In the second part of this interview, Dr. Lynn discusses three of these five critical practices: 1) improvisation, 2) information sharing and exchange and 3) collaboration under pressure. (5 pages)

  2. Phoenix Teams Discover Profitable Concepts at Fluke (Part Two of Two) Locked

    Research | Posted: 2004-06-11

    In the 1990s Fluke Corporation, pioneered a new concept in teamwork: Phoenix teams. A Phoenix team is a small, entrepreneurial group charged with creating quick action in a sector aligned with the corporate mission. In the second part of this interview with Fluke’s Gary Kirchberger he discusses details of the operation of Phoenix teams including such issues as how they are staffed and by whom; with whom they communicate; how the teams are chartered; what teamwork skills are needed to be successful; the best way to involve senior management; how the budget is managed and other issues vital to Phoenix teamwork. (6 pages)

  3. Good Team Chartering Means Better Results Locked

    Research | Posted: 2004-06-11

    Teams are like meetings – they can be productive, effective and energizing, or they can be a waste of time, sluggish, and a drain on valuable resources. The difference, argues George Aslinger and Glen Whipple, often hinges on whether you take time to draft a good charter before you begin work. Organizational effectiveness experts at Avery Dennison's Fasson Roll Division, the leading manufacturer of pressure-sensitive paper for labels, Aslinger and Whipple have vast experience in establishing successful teams. In this article they describe each element that should be a part of every successful team’s charter. (6 pages)

  4. What Makes a Blockbuster New Product? Five Critical Practices That Differentiate the Most Successful Product Teams (Part One of Two) Locked

    Research | Posted: 2004-06-11

    Dr. Gary Lynn, a marketing and innovation professor at Stevens Institute of Technology in Hoboken, NJ., specializes in how companies can become more creative. Dr. Lynn has been an engineer, a designer of successful new products, and the head of R&D for a major division of a medical products company. Lynn and a colleague conducted a ten-year study of over 700 new product teams, including 49 teams that created some of the most successful products ever launched. The researchers did not only distinguish what separates successes from failures but also what separates blockbusters from moderately successful products. They identified five factors that differentiate blockbuster teams. In the first part of this interview, Dr. Lynn discusses two of these five critical practices: 1) the critical role of senior management and 2) creating specific immutable goals for the product that the team must deliver. (5 pages)

  5. Corning's Goalsharing Targets Key Business Results Locked

    Research | Posted: 2004-06-07

    The world’s leading provider of specialty glass, Corning, created its GoalSharing program as a performance-based bonus system to ensure that business units were aligned and working towards common corporate goals. This report will explain Corning’s dissatisfaction with other reward systems and how they created a new program that is based on equitable measurements, encourages employee involvement, and directly improves unit performance. (5 pages)

  6. Flexibility Powers QuantumÂ’s Thunderbolt Team to Market Locked

    Research | Posted: 2004-06-02

    Computer hardware manufacturer, Quantum, discovered that there is a direct correlation between shrinking product life cycles and the need for flexible, effective, quick-response cross-functional teamwork. This report provides an example of how to organize, staff and manage teams as product lifecycles quicken and as a product portfolio broadens and diversifies over time. (6 pages)

  7. Intersolv Stays Ahead of the Pack with Tailored Software Development Cycle Locked

    Research | Posted: 2004-06-02

    Intersolv created a rapid software development process that enables each team to tailor the map to meet project needs. Intersolv’s eight-phase process, facilitated by a software development lifecycle champion, establishes discipline – without hamstringing the team. This report provides nuts and bolts detail about the inner workings of agile development processes. (6 pages)

  8. X-Teams Create Innovation and Rapid Change by Focusing on the External Environment Locked

    Quick Insight | Posted: 2008-08-22

    What is the difference between teams that perform very well and teams that don't? To answer this straightforward question, MIT’s Deborah Ancona and her colleagues have been studying teams for a quarter of a century – hardware teams, software teams, consulting teams, top management teams, manufacturing teams, sales teams – a host of teams in different organizations. Ancona’s research shows that by focusing only on their own internal processes and characteristics, teams are fighting only half the battle. Such internal factors as clear roles and responsibilities, crisply defined goals, the right membership, and effective leadership, are vital, but these qualities alone do not predict success. Why? “Because these teams can build a barrier,” responds Ancona, “a wall between themselves and the external environment.” The alternative is what Ancona calls X-Teams – teams that are externally active. X-Teams create a broad network of connections that enable them to keep pace with shifts in the marketplace, to place their fingers on the pulse of technologies, and to better understand their competitors.

  9. Stand-Up Meetings for Lean Product Development Locked

    Quick Insight | Posted: 2006-06-29

    One of the more effective and innovative tools introduced into its lean product development process by Boston Scientific Corporation is the daily "stand-up" meeting of product development teams. The idea generated much interest among participants at Management Roundtable's Lean Product Development Implementation Summit held June 13-14, 2006 in Chicago. Presented by Philip Ebeling, director, program management, LEAN Product Development at Boston Scientific,stand-up meetings are no longer than ten minutes every day (literally no chairs or sitting allowed). Co-located cross-functional product development teams each hold a stand-up meeting in their own bullpen area to review and discuss the status of their projects. “While stand-up meetings may be more common to operations, in our case it is a very new concept for product development,” says Ebeling.

  10. Expert Panel: Communicating Across Functions and Borders Locked

    Quick Insight | Posted: 2004-12-09

    A panel discussion and Q&A session with MRT communication experts. Panel members:Roger Nagel of Lehigh University Curt Rashke of Texas Instruments Moderated by Jane Hogan of the Management Roundtable. Summary of key points available here.

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