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Showing 31 - 40 of 54 matches

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  1. Innovative and Meaningful to the Market: Techniques to Sense Market Opportunities and Develop Faster and Higher Quality New Product Definitions Locked

    Research | Posted: 2004-09-17

    Rich Gioscia, Director of Design, Palm, Inc. & Chris Conley, Director, Product Design Illinois Institute of Technology A significant barrier to fast and flexible product development is the lack of techniques for sensing new market opportunities and turning that sense into well defined new product attributes. Market and strategic research often provides excellent information on market growth, competitive positions, and technological trends. What this information lacks is insight into the specific criteria and attributes for innovative new products that will deliver on the projected growth. This presentation introduces the research techniques Palm uses to focus on understanding the product's context of use. It shows how this approach leads to a deeper understanding of market needs and specific product attributes that customers value. You will see examples from Palm's field research and some of the latest products that benefited from this approach to research and development. (24 pages)

  2. Integrated Design and Production Sets Pace at Lucent Locked

    Research | Posted: 2004-09-17

    While many companies pay lip service to cross-functionality and integrated, co-located teams, one telecom company, Lucent Technologies, has taken these ideas to their limit with their Product Realization Center (PRC), which puts product design and development, manufacturing, business support functions, delivery, and customer support all under one roof. In this report, you’ll hear how Lucent navigated this major shift in their approach to making product development more efficient and more focused on customer service. (6 pages)

  3. Speeding Time to Market with Early and Frequent Prototyping Locked

    Research | Posted: 2004-09-17

    Ray Sander, Battelle Product Development Group In this presentation, Battelle’s Raymond Sander discusses rapid prototyping, concept modeling, animations, simulations and how they can speed your time to market. He presents methods of prototyping that can be used to develop and drive your design process – and not merely validate it. He explores the misuse of rapid prototyping and identifies new approaches and methodologies. He also discusses trade-offs between Early-Stage Prototyping and later stage modeling. Mr. Sander also presents some case studies of how Battelle used Modeling to develop new technology, to support marketing, to produce clinical parts for medical products, and to explore the possibilities of virtual modeling. (35 pages)

  4. Overcoming the Speed vs. Process Dilemma Locked

    Research | Posted: 2004-09-17

    Brian Montgomery, Director of Product Marketing and Strategy, Blackbaud, Inc. The "ready, fire, aim" speed of rapid prototyping, versus the maximized return on investment of a well thought out, well balanced product portfolio management process, is a classic dilemma for product developers. However, there may be a broader set of choices available beyond the simple "either/or" of fast vs. methodical. This presentation shows how a product portfolio management process was used at two different software companies (as well as a leading hardware company) to incorporate the logical, methodical decision-making associated with good product selection with the rapid prototyping required in today's world. (29 pages)

  5. High-Velocity Development: Hewlett-Packard Veterans Share Lessons from Supply Chain Management Locked

    Research | Posted: 2004-09-17

    Scott Elliott and Brian Hughes, who jointly have more than forty years of experience with Palo, Alto, CA-based Hewlett Packard, think that when it comes to shortening product development time there is a lot to be learned from supply chain management. In this interview, Scott and Brian explain the lessons that development projects can learn from supply chain management practices, analogous concepts in engineering, and the information flow needed to market, manufacture, and deliver a physical product. (7 pages)

  6. Pella Corporation Improves Engineering Effectiveness, Time-to-Market Locked

    Research | Posted: 2004-09-17

    Despite a market leadership position and a strong patent portfolio, John Mitchell, VP of Engineering at window maker, Pella Corporation, felt intense competitive pressure to drastically reduce development cycle time. While sensing that their processes were too loosely followed, John championed an initiative to internally assess their strengths and weaknesses to focus process improvement activity. In this report, you’ll hear how John’s intuitions about his company were validated, what Pella identified as major weaknesses, and their staged approach to implementing better product planning, robust design practices, portfolio management and more. (6 pages)

  7. Preferred Suppliers: Tektronix Keeps it Lean and Rich Locked

    Research | Posted: 2004-09-17

    When Tektronix, Inc. needed to reduce development cycle time, they focused on streamlining supplier management to reduce the administrative burden of purchasing, to strengthen relationships with preferred vendors, and to increase flexibility in product development. In this report you’ll read how Tektronix implemented their Preferred Supplier Initiative (PSI), with a goal of reducing the number of suppliers from 2000 to 150. By using an “open book,” information sharing approach, Tektronix not only drastically reduced the time and effort of choosing and specifying parts, but also gets key suppliers involved earlier, and makes sure engineering is always current on new, emerging technologies. (6 pages)

  8. Focus and Fluidity: Product Development and the Art of Innovation Locked

    Research | Posted: 2004-09-09

    Successful companies aspire to more then just getting to market quickly: a focus on users and an emphasis on enlightened trial and error can help realize the higher goal of a compelling and sustainable future. A world leader in innovation, IDEO has a multitude of lessons to share in the user-centered design of products, services and environments. In this presentation, IDEO’s Craig Sampson showed how companies and individuals can be more creative, more innovative, and more effective in both their work and the realization of their innovation goals. He also explored the methodologies of user-focused design, brainstorming, rapid prototyping, and cross-pollination to show how they have made the critical difference in a wide variety of IDEO projects. Andrew Burroughs, Sr. Engineer, IDEO, also contributes a case study illustrating how the use of prototyping throughout the development process enables teams to identify needs, delight users, and inspire alignment and support by all project stakeholders. (23 pages)

  9. Applying Batch Size in Product Development: Unconventional Wisdom about Speed and Flexibility (Part One of Two) Locked

    Research | Posted: 2004-06-02

    In part one of this exclusive interview, Don Reinertsen explains how the concept of “batch size,” from the manufacturing domain, applies to product development. Reinertsen suggests that product developers reduce the batch size by which information is transferred from one point to another along the product development chain, thus increasing the quantity of information transfers. Reinertsen argues that developers do not need to know all of the requirements before beginning to design – they need to know only enough information to do useful work. (5 pages)

  10. Wisdom from HP: Choosing the Right Product Development Strategy Locked

    Research | Posted: 2004-06-02

    “Different business strategies demand different product development strategies; one size does not fit all.” This is the message from Hewlett-Packard’s (HP) Bill Crandall describing HP's approach to product development strategy. Drawing on HP’s experience from managing 17 multi-billion dollar product lines, Crandall explains how HP selects the right product development strategy for each business line in order to deliver the cost, quality, speed, and risk management required by the business strategy. (7 pages)

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