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  1. Co-Developing Products in Asia: Audio Session Transcript Locked

    Research | Posted: 2006-08-18

    In this audio session, Lothar Katz, principal consultant at Leadership Crossroads and a former Vice President and General Manager at Texas Instruments, shares his insights into co-developing products with Asian partners. Based on empirical studies, Katz points out the key cultural differences – group-orientation, relationship to authority and attitude toward uncertainty – that are the most challenging when collaborating globally. Katz outlines the very significant differences between China, Korea, India, and Japan and how to best motivate teams based in these countries. The speaker also cites American cultural traits that might cause difficulties for Asian counterparts and touches on the question of protecting Intellectual Property. A Question & Answer session with practitioners provides examples of applying Katz’s principles to individual cases. (22 pages)

  2. Communication Across Functions and Borders: Summary of Member Audio-Session Locked

    Research | Posted: 2006-06-09

    For companies involved in collaborative product development with Asian-based teams, communication can be an enormous challenge. This transcript from a panel discussion with Management Roundtable Expert Panel members explores the unique characteristics of working with both India and China. It gives suggestions about protecting intellectual property, building trust, and ensuring quality results. Panel members advised participants to know their core competence, to communicate in terms that don't cause shame (avoid the word "failure"), and to be very clear about strategic objectives. (7 pages)

  3. Global Product Development - Markets and Customers: Transcript of Audio Session Locked

    Research | Posted: 2006-06-09

    This transcript of an audio session with Gerard Bol (Shell Exploration and Production) and Jerry McColgin (Venture2) focuses on the issue of developing products for global markets and customers. The participants discussed such topics as how to get products accepted in local markets; factors for determining when to have a physical presence in a new geography; ways of keeping track of developments in local markets; balancing global and grass roots development; and the challenges of handing off technology developed in one region, to a development group in another. (17 pages)

  4. Palm, Inc. Global Partnerships Give a Small Player a Large Footprint Locked

    Research | Posted: 2006-06-09

    The emergence of a global market provides fresh opportunities for smaller enterprises to demonstrate that agility can compensate for size. Today’s worldwide market also demonstrates that a smaller company has plenty of room to make use of the abundance of offshore resources that, leveraged carefully along with its own, can help it to compete with larger firms. Palm, Inc., has been doing precisely that by effectively partnering with non-US based ODM (original design manufacturing) firms to design, develop and launch new products. These offshore firms, especially those in Asia, enlarge its resource base, enabling Palm to have the kind of market presence enjoyed by larger companies in its product space. (6 pages)

  5. Communication Across Functions and Borders: Transcript of Member Audio-Session Locked

    Research | Posted: 2006-06-09

    For companies involved in collaborative product development with Asian-based teams, communication can be an enormous challenge. This transcript from a discussion with Management Roundtable Expert Panel members explores the unique characteristics of working with both India and China. It gives suggestions about protecting intellectual property, building trust, and ensuring quality results. Panel members advised participants to know their core competence, to communicate in terms that don't cause shame (avoid the word "failure"), and to be very clear about strategic objectives. (17 pages)

  6. Global Product Development - Markets and Customers: Summary of Audio Session Locked

    Research | Posted: 2006-06-09

    This summary of an audio session with Gerard Bol (Shell Exploration and Production) and Jerry McColgin (Venture2) focuses on the issue of developing products for global markets and customers. The participants discussed such topics as how to get products accepted in local markets; factors for determining when to have a physical presence in a new geography; ways of keeping track of developments in local markets; balancing global and grass roots development; and the challenges of handing off technology developed in one region, to a development group in another. (7 pages)

  7. Study: Economic Downturn Threatens Intellectual Property; IP Security Now Key Business Enabler Locked

    Quick Insight | Posted: 2009-05-01

    A January 2009 study conducted by a research center out of Purdue University in partnership with McAfee, Inc., examined where vital information such as Intellectual Property originates, where it is stored globally, and how it is transferred and lost. The study found that the global economic crisis has placed large amounts of Intellectual Property at risk, since IP has now become an international currency and, as a result, an emerging target for cybercriminals. Even with the risks involved, information is on the move; the study found that average company has $12 million (USD) worth of sensitive information residing abroad. The research also found that cutting investments in information security -- on the assumption that security is a cost center and not a vital business enabler -- could prove to be a fatal error.

  8. New Research Finds That Suppliers and Customers Are Most Common Open Innovation Partners; Licensing Limited to a Few Industries Only Locked

    Quick Insight | Posted: 2009-01-16

    A December 2008 working paper of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development identifies some key characteristics of open innovation across countries and across industries. The paper by authors Koen De Backer, Vladimir Lopez-Bassols, and Catalina Martinez (“Open Innovation in a Global Perspective – What Do Existing Data Tell Us?” Directorate of Science, Technology and Industry) notes the lack of empirical, systematic research into open innovation, observing that most of the existing research is based on case studies. The paper also discusses open innovation in light of the increasingly international scope of R&D and innovation, leading to the appearance of global innovation networks.

  9. Identifying Challenges and Success Factors in Design for Environment Locked

    Quick Insight | Posted: 2008-10-31

    Current efforts at Design for Environment (DfE) tend to derive environmental requirements from either a) existing government regulations or b) customers. These two groups by no means exhaust the list of environmental stakeholders over the course of a typical product lifecycle. A recent study of the current state of DfE efforts in 20 Japanese manufacturers in 8 industrial sectors, including home appliance, business machine, automotive, construction machinery, and machine tool companies, suggests that an effective DfE effort must identify all of the stakeholders and their environmental requirements across this entire product timeline. It also implies the ability to track products through the entire lifecycle, from product concept to disassembly and disposal.

  10. A Maturity Model for Offshore Co-development Locked

    Quick Insight | Posted: 2008-10-10

    Where does your company stand with respect to global R&D? Is its approach to collaboration leveraged to create long-term value? In an October 2008 audio session, Atul Goel R&D Practice Leader at consultancy Amritt presented a maturity model for collaboration that begins to answer these questions. The model describes four stages of engagement in offshore collaborations in order from the least to the highest potential value.

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