Skip to navigation, content

Research

Note: FastTrack Members have access to the following Management Roundtable research documents.  Find out more about FastTrack membership options

Using Technology Scouting to Stimulate Innovation: Keys to Focusing the Search Locked

Research | Posted: 2006-08-31

By Jay Paap, President, Paap AssociatesSuccessful technology scouting starts with the right definition of the need, argues Jay Paap in this feature article. To promote innovation, writes Paap, scouting must go beyond seeking sources of known technologies – it must seek out new technologies that provide novel approaches to the problems you face. Think in terms of the problem to be solved, not the technology you think will solve the problem, advises Paap. Define the problem in generic terms to make it easier to identify potential solutions and technological approaches used in other industries. If you’re concerned about missing disruptive technologies, look at changes in customer needs that drive the demand for new technologies. Focus is critical for effective scouting – but focus on the right things: the problems and needs that your technology intends to address. (7 pages)

Held Hostage by Delayed Technology? Locked

Research | Posted: 2006-08-25

Don Reinertsen, President of Reinertsen & Associates For product developers, new technology can be our best friend or our worst enemy. It can be an unparalleled tool to improve product performance. An inelegant design using new technology often outperforms even the most brilliant design using old technology. Unfortunately, new technology has a dark side, introducing uncertainty into schedule and performance goals. Since a project can be as uncertain as its most uncertain element, the entire project schedule can be contaminated by the uncertainty of a single underlying technology. In this brief article, Don Reinertsen argues that the key is to keep technology off the critical path. He presents severalways of pursuing this strategyas well as an analytic approach for articulating the economic argument. (3 pages)

Co-Developing Products in Asia: Audio Session Summary Locked

Research | Posted: 2006-08-18

Related Links: Slides (27 pages) | Transcript (22 pages) | Audio In this audio session, Lothar Katz, principal consultant at Leadership Crossroads and a former Vice President and General Manager at Texas Instruments, shares his insights into co-developing products with Asian partners. Based on empirical studies, Katz points out the key cultural differences – group-orientation, relationship to authority andattitude towarduncertainty – that are the most challenging when collaborating globally. Katz outlines the very significant differences between China, Korea, India, and Japan and how to best motivate teams based in these countries. The speaker also cites American cultural traits that might cause difficulties for Asian counterparts and touches on the question of protecting Intellectual Property. A Question & Answer session with practitioners provides examples of applying Katz’s principles to individual cases. (10 pages)

Co-Developing Products in Asia: Audio Session Transcript Locked

Research | Posted: 2006-08-18

In this audio session, Lothar Katz, principal consultant at Leadership Crossroads and a former Vice President and General Manager at Texas Instruments, shares his insights into co-developing products with Asian partners. Based on empirical studies, Katz points out the key cultural differences – group-orientation, relationship to authority and attitude toward uncertainty – that are the most challenging when collaborating globally. Katz outlines the very significant differences between China, Korea, India, and Japan and how to best motivate teams based in these countries. The speaker also cites American cultural traits that might cause difficulties for Asian counterparts and touches on the question of protecting Intellectual Property. A Question & Answer session with practitioners provides examples of applying Katz’s principles to individual cases. (22 pages)

Open Innovation and Metrics: Designing Partnerships for Measurability Locked

Research | Posted: 2006-08-09

An Interview with Wayne Mackey, principal consultant, PDC Inc. In this August 2006 interview, consultant and metrics expert Wayne Mackey, a principal consultant with Product Development Consulting, Inc., discusses the special challenges of measuring open innovation projects. Mackey’s research indicates that communication is the single most important focus for open innovation metrics. Mackey discusses the different types of open innovation projects and where the levers of control reside in each case. Mackey also provides a framework for categorizing the roles and responsibilities on each side of the partnership and gives ten general metrics that form a starter list for measuring open innovation. Finally, Mackey generates a short list of “do’s” and “don’ts” for measuring open innovation projects. Mackey’s work suggests that best practice organizations are consciously designing partnerships for measurability. (7 pages)

Design for Uncertainty: Audio Session Summary Locked

Research | Posted: 2006-07-22

Related Links: Slides(29 pages)| Transcript (22 pages)|AudioIn this audio session, Preston Smith, of consultancy New Product Dynamics, presents techniques for enhancing flexible product development. He discusses why flexibility is valuable and mentions some of the tradeoffs involved. Smith also discusses the role of customers and their requirements in a flexible environment. He presents some detailed techniques for fostering a flexible product development process through product architectures, experimentation and the use of set-based design. He also examines the impact of flexible product development on internal factors such as development teams, decision-making, project management and the product development process. This presentation provides a comprehensive overview of some of the latest thinking on innovative, flexible approaches to product development. (11 pages)

Lean Product Development Summit: Early Successes Encourage Future Applications Locked

Research | Posted: 2006-07-17

This report provides an overview of a June 2006 conference on Lean product development. It summarizes presentations from product development practitionersfrom Hewlett-Packard, Isothermal Systems Research, Cessna Aircraft, and Honeywell Aerospace. These summaries present the challenges each company was facing, the Lean principles applied, and the measurable results achieved. Each of these firms represent a different level of maturity with respect to Lean product development, but each of them also reported significant gains – with, in most cases, the hard numbers to support them. The conference participants made a powerful case for applying those aspects of the Lean toolkit that are most appropriate in the domain of product development. These practices include batch size reduction, queue management techniques, parallel processes, the removal of non-value-added activities, and flow management. (7 pages)

Rethinking the Stage-Gate® Process – A Reply to the Critics Locked

Research | Posted: 2006-07-12

with Bob Becker, Product Development Executive, Advisor and MRT FastTrack Expert Panelist In this article, Bob Becker responds to recent criticisms of the Stage-Gate process. Becker argues that Stage-Gate remains a useful model but the key is in the implementation. Most of the defects in Stage-Gate implementations are due to rigid applications of the process that do not take advantage of common opportunities to perform some activities in parallel or to adapt the process to the type of project at hand. For Stage-gates to be a success, says Becker, it is necessary to plan projects to be right sized and efficient. The gates in the process should serve as business checkpoints; these checks should be performed with both the marketplace and the portfolio in mind. Becker also answers, point-by-point, the critics of the Stage-Gate framework. Concludes Becker: “A process that leverages historical learning and best practices from industry leaders, and which is also right sized for the mission at hand, is as close to optimal as you’ll get.” (5 pages)

Boston Scientific Corporation: Successful Lean Product Development Boosts Efficiency Locked

Research | Posted: 2006-07-06

In this report, Philip J. Ebeling, Director of Program Management, Lean Product Development at Boston Scientific Corporation’s Maple Grove, Minnesota facility describes his company’s successful Lean product development implementation. Boston Scientific turned to Lean to help reduce product development investment, while still managing risk and market requirements. According to Ebeling, Boston Scientific adopted a custom approach to Lean, using a hybrid of Toyota’s product developmentsystem and abstract ideas from the Lean literature, integrated with best practices in product development. Boston Scientific chose three Lean tools and focused its energies on learning and applying this small set in order to achieve quick wins. Having proved the case for Lean, the company achieved marked success applying its principles to team performance. As Lean has spread to other projects, Boston Scientific has enjoyed improvements across the dimensions of cost, schedule and performance. (6 pages)

The Right I-Stuff: Intellectual Capital Management for Open Innovation Locked

Research | Posted: 2006-06-28

Sharon Oriel of Talisker and Associates, and formerly with The Dow Chemical Company, was an early co-founder of the Intellectual Capital Managers Gathering. In this exclusive interview, Oriel discusses the evolution of capital management at Dow Chemical; the need for a precise terminology around intellectual assets; building questions about intangible assets into the product development process; managing knowledge flow in open innovation projects; the role of the legal department; and the global dimensions of managing intangible assets. (6 pages)

Page ... 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 ... 52